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Monthly Archives: December 2012

What is a ‘writer’?

Am I a ‘writer’? I don’t think so, or I don’t think many people would consider me to be one, but I have certainly written millions of words in my lifetime. I’m leaving aside personal letters (and, over the past 20 years or so, emails), reports and the like, which would account for many, many thousands of words. For around 10 years I wrote no less than 5,000 words a week, so a total of 2.5 million words would be a very conservative estimate during this time alone. In the remaining 40 or so years of my adult life I’ve probably averaged a weekly writing output of about a fifth of this, so around another 2 million in all. Let’s say around 5 million words in total. You might gather that I like to write. Does this make me a ‘writer’?

Grumpytyke

Several of the blogs I follow add the strapline ‘author’, or mention that this is what they are in the ‘About’. I think I understand what this means.
 
However, some add ‘writer’ as a strap line or describe themselves as this. I’m not sure I understand what this means (I know the dictionary definitions of course).
 
Am I a ‘writer’? I don’t think so, or I don’t think many people would consider me to be one, but I have certainly written millions of words in my lifetime. I’m leaving aside personal letters (and, over the past 20 years or so, emails), reports and the like, which would account for many, many thousands of words. For around 10 years I wrote no less than 5,000 words a week, so a total of 2.5 million words would be a very conservative estimate during this time alone. In the remaining 40…

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Posted by on December 27, 2012 in short stories, writing

 

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Xlibris Writer’s Workshop Presents: Inspiration for Writing – Part One

Notwithstanding how much you love to write, there will always be times when inspiration will not come and frustration kicks in. Inspiration is the essential ingredient every author must have.  Every writer needs to be inspired to find that brilliant book within them. Inspiration can come from a plethora of sources. In this first of a series of articles written for our new Xlibris Writer’s Workshop, we will explore a few sources you may of thought of and/or use right now. If you don’t; great! If you do, let these tips act as a reminder.

Keep a notebook handy:

This is a must for anybody who wants to write. Jot down your thoughts as they occur, use it to record quotes, plot ideas, character references, snippets of good phrases and conversation. Then use it as a research tool for your writing.

 

Listen to people:

When you are out in public, listen for what people are saying. I don’t mean eavesdrop, but keep quiet and your ears open for any interesting and relevant bits of dialog, and then jot it down in your notebook quickly.

Use your friends and family:

Speaking with friends and family can be a knowledgeable spring of inspiration. These conversations can stir the pot, focus your thoughts and produce ideas you had not envisaged. This can result in something that is greater than the sum of the parts.

Quotes:

Quotes are another massive source for insight. There are many internet quote sites you can visit to experience the words and sayings of the great and the good. Hopefully these will motivate and thrill you to greater heights in your efforts.

Source: Xlibris Writer’s Workshop Presents: Inspiration for Writing – Part One

 
 

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Amazon yanks self-published ebook over a Star Wars reference

 
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Posted by on December 27, 2012 in kindle, Self Publishing

 

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Should I Self Publish or Use A Traditional Author?

Book Publishing and Review Blog

Numerous authors battling the inquiry of whether to call a typical publishing property getting their book released, or strike out by themselves and self release it.

A great deal of authors today are making the selection to self-publish as opposed to go after a standard bargain because they believe they could create and market their books better, giving them a better profit in the long run.

Others believe that there is a certain quantity of eminence in receiving a standard publishing contract. If it’s the eminence you are trying to find at that point you most likely do not wish to self-publish your book. If you merely want to obtain your exercise and in to the hands of everyone, while preventing the being rejected letters, at that point self-publishing joins your greatest passion.

See Also: Self Publishing – Not An Easy Task

Yet another point you required look at when…

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5 Reasons I Don’t Care I Lost Money Self-publishing

Today, this experience helps me build my platform as a writer. My presentations and workshops on the writing craft and industry allow me to give back to other writers what I’ve received. – Zoe M. McCarthy

 

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The Editing Process

I think I’m beginning to know where to start now. How about you?

The View Outside

To continue with the theme of editing this month I came across an excellent video on YouTube where writer David Farland gives a talk that describes his editing process.

Farland breaks his editing down into 6 separate processes/types of edit:

1. Triage
2. Voice Edit
3. Descriptive Edit
4. Shotgun
5. Syllabic
6. Line Edit

It’s a very interesting talk, and yes, it is long. So grab a coffee, your notebook and pen and enjoy. A lot of what he said made total sense to me, although the idea of editing my MS 6 times is a little daunting! Lol

I think I’m beginning to know where to start now. How about you?

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Posted by on December 27, 2012 in writing

 

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Analyzing the Behavior of Book Buyers Part 3 – Reviews

Next comes the dreaded reading of the reviews. Some browsers will read a bunch of comments; other only a few. You can be sure, though, that they’ll all look at the top rated one for the “Most Helpful Customer Reviews” and that they’re all looking for the following:

  • Assurance that someone out there has actually bought and read your book.
  • Assurance that the book isn’t total crap.
  • Highly individual criteria.

Brian W. Foster

In Part 1 of this series, I examined how book buyers find your page.  In Part 2, I wrote about the first thing they look at on your page.

At this point, the potential customer has found your book and, after reading the description, is intrigued.  You’re home free, right?  Wrong.

Next comes the dreaded reading of the reviews.  Some browsers will read a bunch of comments; other only a few.  You can be sure, though, that they’ll all look at the top rated one for the “Most Helpful Customer Reviews” and that they’re all looking for the following:

  • Assurance that someone out there has actually bought and read your book.
  • Assurance that the book isn’t total crap.
  • Highly individual criteria.

We can’t control that a potential buyer might read something innocuous in a review that makes him click away.  There’s no accounting for taste, and you have to…

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Posted by on December 26, 2012 in Marketing, Self Publishing

 

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