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Category Archives: Marketing

Xlibris Writer’s Workshop Presents Self-Marketing Your Book

The creative freedom that self-publishing affords aspiring writers (especially from conventional publishing practices) entails more self-marketing effort. Accomplished independent author J.A. Konrath believes that writers are largely responsible for promoting their books.

“There are 50,000 novels published a year, and four out of five don’t make money. You have to get people to read you, or else you won’t be a writer for very long,” he said.  

Here are self-marketing tips from thriving self-pubbed writers who have proven that success in what was once known as “vanity publishing” is real and attainable.

“Don’t let the things you don’t have prevent you from using what you do have.”– John Locke

While the American e-book writer of crime fiction had no formal training as a writer, his gift of imagination not only propelled his writing success but also his marketing strategies. He believes that cost-free marketing can reap good results if you have “enthusiasm, empathy, people skills.”

“There’s always a way to compensate for what you don’t have. If I’m not as smart as you, I’ll have to work harder. If another woman is prettier than you, you might have to be more charming. There’s always a way to compensate,” Locke stressed.

“Guy’s provided me with such great content all year, the least I can do is buy his $10 book.”– Guy Kawasaki

With his bold statement that traditional publishers are having aneurysm from the growing influence of indies, the self-published author/entrepreneur recently published his book APE: Author- Publisher – Entrepreneur – How to Publish a Book co-authored with Shawn Welch. Kawasaki, however, reminds hopefuls that content quality very important. Perhaps such an advice is self-explanatory and surely the first step to attaining marketing success.

“I have beta readers, copyeditors, and an army of proofers and before I publish each book I have to make sure every one of them is available when I need them at the right time to release my book. I also have to make sure I’ve set aside time to design my cover, create my marketing copy and reach out to my readers when the book is released.”– Bella Andre

The New York Times and USA Today bestselling author have sold more over 1.5 million books to date. The figures speak for themselves. Also a full-time wife and mother, Bella juggles her demanding tasks pretty well. Only a disciplined person can pull that off.

Ready to make it big as an indie? The Xlibris Writer’s Workshop is here to guide you in your self-publishing journey from start to finish. Read more writing, editing, and marketing tips at theXlibris Blog.

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20 Inspiring Quotes To Help You Finish Writing Your Book . . . This Year

Intriguing Insights on How to Create Compelling Communications That Pass The Eyebrow Test®

“Writing a book is like driving a car at night; you can only see to the end of your headlights … but you can make the whole trip that way.” – E. L.  Doctorow

For twenty years, I’ve had the joyful job of helping people get their ideas and experiences out of their head and into the world in the shape of books, presentations and e-products.

I tell them, “Books in your head and on your computer help no one.”

Have you ever thought of it that way?

If you have insights, experience and experitse that would benefit others; it’s selfish to keep it to yourself.

When you think about it that way; writing is a way of contributing your gift to the world.

It’s a way of saying, “This is what I’ve learned, what I’ve seen.  I’m sharing it with you as an offering.

I’m not saying it’s perfect.  I’m not saying ‘I know…

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Posted by on January 15, 2013 in Marketing

 

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How to Become a Successful Author

Brian W. Foster

This post is the final part of my Analyzing the Behavior of Book Buyers Series.  See Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.

There’s a lot of bad news if you’re trying to replace your day-job income with your passion for writing:

  • There are millions of books out there, and people just keep writing more!  Would they just stop already?  It’s hard to stand out from the crowd.
  • If someone does happen to find your book page, you have opportunities to lose them with you description, the reviews, your preview section, and the price.

There is, however, one piece of very good news: Book Buyers actively look for books.

I’ll buy somewhere between 20 and 30 novels this year.  There are a lot of Goodreads members who have goals of reading more than 50 a year.  In order to buy that many books, we’re going…

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Posted by on January 7, 2013 in Marketing, Publishing

 

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The Seven Secrets to Ebook Publishing Success

 

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The Problem with Self-Published Authors

J.D. McLaughlin

Here I go again. Jumping on the self-published authors soapbox, telling you that I read a lot of self-published fiction (both good and bad). This time, though, I’m going to go to the flip side:

What bothers me and will make me less likely to read your book if I haven’t picked it up all by my lonesome.

Now, the majority of self-published fiction that I have read I stumbled upon myself. I was digging through Amazon for something to read, probably saw a pretty cover and decided to see what it was about. If I read an author and enjoyed the book, I was willing to see what other authors they recommended. So when I read some Amanda Hocking and thought she was fun, I saw JL Bryan and decided I loved his Jenny Pox book. Heather Hildenbrand I stumbled upon. A book called Gravity by Melissa West popped…

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Analyzing the Behavior of Book Buyers Pt 5 – Price

Brian W. Foster

See Parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of this series.

If a browser reads your sample and likes it, he’s going to buy it, right?  Nope.  You still have one big hurdle to clear — price.  A few thoughts on the subject:

  • Price isn’t necessarily the last thing the browser considers.  It’s a factor that can lose you the sale at any point during the process.  It might even be the first thing the potential buyer examines.
  • Sometimes, setting price is about maximizing profit.  Selling fewer books at a higher margin may bring you more money than selling a lot at a smaller margin.
  • Sometimes, setting price is about exposure.  In the long run, getting a sample of your work into the hands of as many people as possible may outweigh short term profit.
  • A price point that is too low may indicate to the potential customer…

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