RSS

Tag Archives: social media

21 Quick Tips: How to Write a Blog for Your Business

21 Quick Tips: How to Write a Blog for Your Business

Do you want to improve how you write a blog for business?

Here are 21 tips on how to write a blog for your business blog in a step by step way. Below the how to write a blog for business graphic is a few tips on each step to help you get more clicks, more traffic and build your brand community.

21 Tips On How To Write a Blog For Your Business

My father always used to lecture me of getting the foundations right, getting the research or work done so you know what your doing. As a teenager whilst that was good advice I often ignored it and learnt the hard way (luckily no serious damage was done only some minor accidents e.g. a tree house that fell down with friends and me in it), that this approach did make sense despite my impulse to just jump in and do it.

If you want to learn how to write a blog then you need to understand your customers and write content that they are going to find useful and engaging. Do your homework and you will get more traffic, more click and more leads. But it does take time to get it right and for it to be on target with your customers. You need to prepared to make mistakes and learn from them. Here are 21 tips to help you write a blog for your business blog and get better results.

Targeting Your Customers
how to target customers when business blogging
When you are learning how to write a blog you can easily spread yourself too thin and you will not get the results you are looking for – staying focused is critical.

  • Key action – write down who you key target customer is just one e.g. if BtoB: size of business, number of people, turnover, their sectors, greaography…
  • narrow down your marketing to niche market/market segments – think long tail here
  • Use marketing personas to build out who you are targeting and give them a personality.
  • Use any data you have to support your marketing persona e.g. age, demographic data.
  • Check with others in the business e.g. sales, customer service – that the persona(s) are right.

Find Them Online
how to focus on your customer when business blogging
Understand where your customers spend time online and you will be able to listen to them and connect in the right places.

Social Media Listening
how to write a blog and improve how you listen to your customers online for business blogging
Set a budget for the tools – whilst some are free, the better ones do cost but are worth the investment.

Understand Their Problems
how to write a blog for customers online for your business blog
When you are trying to master how to write a blog always put your self in the shoes of your customers. Listen to their problems – what information are they searching for, what service problems do they have, is their misunderstanding about a product or service, do they have wishlists…

  • Key action – Write a list of the most common problems, gaps in information and issues
  • Prioritise your list

Identify How You Can Help Them
how to write a blog and get to grips with customers problems when blogging
This is where you need to be realistic and match what you and your business are good at to their problems.

  • Key Action – With the list of problems highlight the ones you are confident that you can write about and fit to your business.
  • Draft a list of ideas around each problem – this will be used later

Review The Competition
how to write a blog and review competition when business blogging
Take into account what your competition are blogging about, what topics tehy are focusing on

Key actions

  • Identify their key topics e.g. categories on their blog page
  • See what posts have been popular and assess why
  • Identify how you can be different / better than them
  • Don’t be a copy cat

Identify How You Can Help Them
how to write a blog tell your brand message in your business blog
What do you stand for and why should people follow your – what is the core message that will attract and be relevant to your audience.

Key Actions

  • Develop an easy strap line that helps people understand what your about
  • Build your message into your blogs and communications

Set Your Goals, Objectives and Metrics
how to write a blog for business content marketing
This is the critical part. If you are going to invest in blogging set your self some clear goals for the results. What do you want to achieve (be realistic) and what business benefit will it deliver e.g. 5 leads per week.
Key Actions

  • Use SMART objectives (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timed)
  • Be sure you can measure them
  • Produce a spreadsheet and plan out your targets by week/month and then your results

Develop Your Strategy and Tactics
set your how to write a blog strategy
Plan in the strategy that is going to work for you – how your blog content fits to your overall marketing plan and communications mix.

Key actions

  • What are the key resources and actions needed to achieve your goals?
  • What are the daily/weekly tasks you are going to schedule?

10 Build Your Blog
build out your business blog using wordpress
A good blog needs a good home. Invest in a WordPress blog that is going to fit to your brand and be easy for people to engage with.
Key actions

  • Make sure you choose a responsive theme – the rise of the mobile consumer is here see these stats
  • Build in the styles and design features that can help your blog stand out
  • Blogs are increasing becoming more visual so add in the styling that will help you produce a good visual layout – think more magazine than blog

11 Build Out Marketing Functionality
build into your blog the marketing plugins and themes you need
Your blog needs to be able to turn traffic into buying customers and to do that you need to have the right marketing functionality. Looking good is not enough.
Key actions

  • Build in your key conversion points and methods to convert customers
  • Add in tracking e.g. goals so you can measure performance

12 Link Your Social and Email
how to write a blog and build in social and email
Key actions:

  • Hook up your blog with your social networks so that people can easily share your content.
  • Also build in your email subscriptions to build your email list.

13 Develop Your Editorial Calendar
build your business blog editorial calendar for effective blogging
This is probably on of the most important steps. An editorial calendar will help stay focused and give you a good schedule to work to. It is even more important if you have more than 1 person in your business blogging.
Key actions

  • Be realistic and don’t forget to add in the other content that you are producing
  • Balance out your categories to make it more varied and interesting for your audience

14 Research Your Keywords and Phrases
develop the seo that is right for your blog

Key actions

15 Develop Your Killer Headlines
how to write a blog killer headlines
Your titles make the difference between a click and no-click a share and just a read. Spend time coming up with awessome titles.
Key actions

Key Actions

  • Think like a magazine editor here
  • Download our content marketing guide and use our list of formulas for killer headlines

16 Write Your Blog and Format
how to write a blog and format headlines
Write your blogs and rewrite them. Find your own personal voice and practice – it takes to to develop a writing style that is right for you. Write as if you are talking to your marketing persona and helping them.
Key actions

  • Don’t be afraid – everyone goes through times of uncertainty and doubt when writing. It can be hard but bit by bit you will improve
  • Remember there is only one you and that is unique and special use it to to your advantage and intertwine the personal and business
  • End each post with a call to action or ask for people’s opinions

17 Publish To Your Social Networks
publish and market your business blog
You have to promote your blog and ensure it is found.
Key actions

  • Publish to your main social networks and invite comments and feedback

18 Respond To Comments
respond to your audience comments
Comments are the gold of blogging and so actively invite comments and always respond promptly to them

  • Use a good commenting system such as Disqus
  • Respond and be helpful, never rude. Remove any spam to keep you blog clean

19 Track Your Performance
track the performance of your blog
With each blog post you move one step closer to achieving your goals. Track your metrics and review regularly.

20 Rinse and Repeat – Improve
how to improve your business blog
Some blog posts will do well whilst others may not achieve the results you had hoped for. Learn from your spikes and dips and continually refine your editorial calendar to improve titles, content and how you reach and attract your audience. Importantly make sure you are turning your blog into tangible business results.

21 Don’t Forget To Enjoy It and Be Creative
how to write a blog and be creative
This may seem obvious but have fun, enjoy it and if you are passionate about helping people and equally enthusiastic about your business your blog will do well. Experiment by adding in different media and help to make your business human. Your customers will appreciate being part of your tribe.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 8, 2013 in Blogging

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Is LinkedIn Trying To Get Into The Self-Publishing Game with Pulse?

BookWorks

Almost everyone these days has a LinkedIn account, whether they need one or not — in fact I can’t tell you how many of my actor friends got one in college and never check it! But when you’re in a more straightforward profession than acting, or if you’re looking for ways to put yourself out there, it’s worth having a Linkedin profile.

12e018532d913494d841f79da5dd70bf_1

However, in the world of publishing and personal branding, Linkedin gets forgotten much of the time. Who needs a Linkedin when you already have a Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, and personal website, you might say?

Linkedin has apparently noticed this and, like Barnes and Noble, wants to make more of themselves in the self-publishing industry. Yesterday they announced the purchase of Pulse, a “social reading company” (sort of like an RSS feed, but prettier) as part of their first step toward becoming a “professional publishing platform.”

Here’s what…

View original post 242 more words

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Amazon to buy GoodReads

BookWorks

goodreadsExciting news! According to Galleycat, yesterday Amazon reached an agreement to buy the popular social networking site GoodReads, which we mentioned in our recent article about social media.

Here’s what the press release says:

“Amazon and Goodreads share a passion for reinventing reading,” said Russ Grandinetti, Amazon Vice President, Kindle Content. “Goodreads has helped change how we discover and discuss books and, with Kindle, Amazon has helped expand reading around the world. In addition, both Amazon and Goodreads have helped thousands of authors reach a wider audience and make a better living at their craft. Together we intend to build many new ways to delight readers and authors alike.”

 

“Books – and the stories and ideas captured inside them – are part of our social fabric,” said Otis Chandler, Goodreads CEO and co-founder. “People love to talk about ideas and share their passion for the stories…

View original post 239 more words

 
 

Tags: , , , , ,

How Much Does it Cost to Self-Publish a Book?

How much does it cost to self-publish a book

The way I see it self-publishing a book is much like planning and launching a business. It is very easy to spend way more than you set out to. A good self-publishing plan can help you keep your spending in check and keep your priorities where they should be. Here is a breakdown of some of the costs you can expect when self-publishing:

Beta Readers: Free – $200. You will need some willing participants besides your friends and family who will give you their honest opinion before you start the process of turning manuscript into book.

Cover Design: $200 – $1000. Unless you have graphic design experience, I wouldn’t attempt this as a DIY. I pass up so many self-pub’d books due to poor cover design.

*Proof Reader and Editor: $500 – $3000. This is a critical step! There is nothing worse than a poorly edited book. Save lots of $$ here if you happen to have a close relationship with someone who is an editor or an editor that is willing to barter with you.

ISBN: Free – $250. ISBNs are free in Canada, but must be purchased in the US. The cost is $125 for 1 ISBN or $250 for 10. You will most likely need an ISBN for your ebook and a separate one for your paper copy (Kindle books do not use ISBNs). If you are planning on releasing multiple versions or titles 10 is the way to go. Most self-publishing companies also offer a free ISBN, but they will be listed as your publisher. With your own ISBN you can choose your own publishing company name.

Book Layout and Formatting: $150 – $350. Depending on the shape of your manuscript, the intricacies of Self publish infoyour design ideas and how many changes you need to make after submitting to the designer.

Author Photo: $200 – $700. If you know someone who is a photographer, great, save some money here! While a professional author photo is not required to publish a book it sure makes the back cover  look great and you will need one for putting together your media kit for marketing the book down the road.

Book Listing: $25 – $300. Depending on your self-pub service they may charge a fee for your book to be made available for book sellers and online retailers.

Ebook Conversion: Free – $200. With some dedication and technical knowledge you can do this one yourself in Microsoft word. Otherwise choose a service provider that can format your ebook for you.

Book Printing: You don’t actually have to order your own books beyond your review copy but I highly recommend having some to send to reviewers and media. It’s also a good idea to include book parties in your marketing plan, and you should definitely have books on hand to sell for those. These costs vary greatly but as a basic idea you can view how Createspace determines cost per copy. You can also view aCreatespace royalty calculator.

Proof Copy: $20 – $50.  Once all your files are submitted you will want a copy to go over to double and triple check for errors. You may want extra copies to enlist other to put their eyes on it to see things you may have missed.

Book Marketing and PR: $50-$20000. There are a vast amount of things you can spend money on when marketing your book. A few examples: review copies $5-$10, author website and hosting $60 – $600,  book Trailer Free – $800, materials like bookmarks, postcards etc. $50+, advertisements $20+, online marketing plan $200+. A great way to keep these costs down and give your book a great head start is to start building up social media followers at least a year in advance and work on it daily, with a goal of a minimum a few thousand followers.

These are some costs that should be considered but every book is different and so will each self-publishing experience.  I would recommend getting quotes from all your providers before starting out on your project.

Visit the original post here.

 

You might also like:

 

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

101 Thoughts on Self-Publishing — 001: Get Active on Social Media

101 Thoughts on Self-Publishing -- 001: Get Active on Social MediaI was toying around with the idea of making a series of articles called “101 Self-Publishing Tips.” I dutifully began compiling a list of tips, but after the first few dozen, I realized that a lot of them were not tips so much as thoughts, but still things that I felt were important to mention to those interested in self-publishing. Besides, I don’t know if I am really the one to be giving people tips. That would imply I know what the hell I’m doing. Also note that these thoughts reflect my personal experiences. Your own experiences may differ.
So here, presented one at a time as they occur to me and as I have the time to write them, are my 101 Thoughts on Self-Publishing. They will be presented in no particular order, but I’ll try to keep related thoughts flowing in a logical manner. I’ll try to do two or three a week, but I’m not making any promises just now.
001: Get Active on Social Media
If you’ve found this blog, chances are you came across it on social media. Why is this important? Well, you now know my name, and if you look to the right of this page you know the titles of my books.  Even if someone who finds you the way you found me isn’t initially inspired to buy your books, that name recognition builds valuable word-of-mouth potential. When a friend recommends a book, having heard of the author provides an addition “authority”–nebulous as it may be–and a reader is more likely to act on that perceived authority. Even if they’re just scanning titles on Amazon, your book will stand out if the readers thinks, “Oh yeah, I’ve heard of him/her!”
Social social media is great for two things: getting your name out to the public and building relationships, both with other authors and potential readers.
Now, social media can either be a blast or a pain in the ass. It can either be valuable time spent marketing and networking, or it can be a black hole into which all your hopes and dreams are relentlessly sucked. But for a self-published (and even trad-published) author, it is an essential part of getting your books in front of eyes.
I am personally active on Twitter and Facebook.
With Twitter, you can do a lot of things in 140 characters: greet new followers, share jokes and random thoughts, compliment and congratulate other writers on their books, etc. Even so, I find the format annoyingly limited. It’s difficult to have a true, relationship-building conversation on Twitter. But it’s great for making connections that one can later pursue on Facebook or via email, and I have met some wonderful friends that way. Promoting your book on Twitter is important, but be sure you spend at least as much time posting things not so obviously self-serving. Triberr is a great program by which you can post links to others’ blog posts and they in turn will post yours. It keeps your content varied and ensures that you’re posting a lot of information that is not directly leading back to you. Just be sure to limit the number of groups (called Tribes) that you participate in, or Followers can get overwhelmed by your constant Tweeting. More on Triberr in a future post.
Facebook is great for building on the relationships you’ve formed on Twitter. Since you can get across a lot more information than you can on Twitter, it’s also best for sharing quotes from reviews, updates about your releases, or even just sharing the things that are going on in your life. You can also make a “page” on Facebook for people to like if you don’t want your private Facebook account to be public. This does, however, limit the flow of conversation as you won’t see the posts of people who have liked your page; you can’t engage with them by commenting on the things they post.
I’ve met some authors on Facebook or Twitter who had one but not the other. By not using both, you are unnecessarily limiting your potential reach. There are certainly other social media sites, but I recommend all self-published authors get active on these two, at the very least.
There are also book-specific sites such as Goodreads. I’m not as active there as I could be, but just by having an account, I get tons of friend requests. As mentioned above, those are people who are learning my name and the titles of my books, and that has powerful potential. You can also announce events such as book giveaways, contests, new releases, personal appearances, etc. Even if you don’t do a lot on Goodreads, I recommend keeping your account up to date by adding all new releases. It’s just one more place for people to see your books.
If you enjoyed today’s thoughts, look to the sidebar on the right and you can follow by email to receive notices when I have new posts and also join the site with Google Friend Connect. If you have additional thoughts or observations, I’d love to hear them! Just leave a comment below.
All the Best,
Visit the original post here.
 
1 Comment

Posted by on January 29, 2013 in Self Publishing

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

What’s Worked in my Self-Publishing Journey so Far

Dionne Lister - Author

Hello again. Today I was bragging about the fact that Shadows of the Realm (SOTR) was still in the top 100 for teenage literature fiction books on Amazon after two weeks up there. Even though it’s liable to drop out at any moment, today was good because I was sitting ahead of one of the Twilight books and one of the Gossip Girl books—it just proves dragons still have some clout. After I tweeted it out, I had a comment from another indie author who wanted to know how I had made it this far. I’ve been meaning to write about my experience for a while, and that was a good reminder. So here’s some of what I’ve learned. I hope it helps someone, somewhere, especially when you feel like giving up—believe me, you’re not the first and won’t be the last.

Screen Shot 2013-01-22 at 3.06.53 PMSelf-publishing is a tough business—you have to be…

View original post 1,266 more words

 
2 Comments

Posted by on January 22, 2013 in Self Publishing

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Five tips to building your platform as a self-published author

The Journal Writer's Handbook

Reading back over my last few entries, here’s the heads-up on the key steps to building an authentic marketing platform for your book – and for it to feel easy rather than utterly terrifying or a real ball-ache:

  1. Make friends with a local journalist or editor. Remember they need copy to keep their publication in business. As a writer you deal in their life-blood. They will love to receive your press release as a local news story.
  2. Build an authentic network off-line by engaging in activities you are genuinely interested in and feel compelled to contribute to. Let your network be a by-product of your participation rather than its raison d’etre . This way people will get to know the real you rather than the networking you.
  3. Offer yourself as a speaker to a local group or society. You could tell your writer’s story, or speak on a subject that you…

View original post 137 more words

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 18, 2013 in Self Publishing

 

Tags: , , , , , ,