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Category Archives: writing tips

So You Want To Know How To Get Published?

Quirky Warrior Woman Writer Kimberly A. Cook

by Kimberly A. Cook           (Twitter@ WarriorTales)

It might be easier to explain how to build an Ark. From scratch. But since a friend asked for a writer friend, let me give this a shot. A long time ago in a galaxy far away before the Internet, traditional publishing lived in New York City and writers tried to get agents who then submitted their work to publishing companies who decided who would get published.

Then along came the Internet in the mid-1980s and web pages and writers were called content providers. (Always hated that title.) A new product called ebooks came into being in the early 2000s and soon a group of rebels (authors and writers) realized they could overcome the Death Star of New York publishing houses and authorpreneurs/publishers were born in the great Indie publishing skirmishes which continue today.

So one decision you need to make about getting published is whether you want to be with the traditionals or…

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Posted by on January 22, 2013 in writing tips

 

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Xlibris Writer’s Workshop Presents: Inspiration for Writing – Part One

Notwithstanding how much you love to write, there will always be times when inspiration will not come and frustration kicks in. Inspiration is the essential ingredient every author must have.  Every writer needs to be inspired to find that brilliant book within them. Inspiration can come from a plethora of sources. In this first of a series of articles written for our new Xlibris Writer’s Workshop, we will explore a few sources you may of thought of and/or use right now. If you don’t; great! If you do, let these tips act as a reminder.

Keep a notebook handy:

This is a must for anybody who wants to write. Jot down your thoughts as they occur, use it to record quotes, plot ideas, character references, snippets of good phrases and conversation. Then use it as a research tool for your writing.

 

Listen to people:

When you are out in public, listen for what people are saying. I don’t mean eavesdrop, but keep quiet and your ears open for any interesting and relevant bits of dialog, and then jot it down in your notebook quickly.

Use your friends and family:

Speaking with friends and family can be a knowledgeable spring of inspiration. These conversations can stir the pot, focus your thoughts and produce ideas you had not envisaged. This can result in something that is greater than the sum of the parts.

Quotes:

Quotes are another massive source for insight. There are many internet quote sites you can visit to experience the words and sayings of the great and the good. Hopefully these will motivate and thrill you to greater heights in your efforts.

Source: Xlibris Writer’s Workshop Presents: Inspiration for Writing – Part One

 
 

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My Editing Plan for the New Year

Come January, I’ll be getting stuck in to my edits. I’ll also be blogging my editing journey as I go along, and sharing what works for me and what doesn’t (and probably asking you to hold my hand when I send my manuscript off to my editor).

 

Stacey J. Mitchell

Editing. I know it has to be done, but until recently, I didn’t have a clue where to start! As you may know, I’m a novice when it comes to novel writing anyway, and after many false starts only completed my first first draft a few months ago.

So I decided that first of all, I needed to learn more, and I’ve done a lot of research into how various novelists go about the editing process. (Thank goodness for the internet and blogs, enabling me to get my hands on a lot of information very easily and quickly!)

Based on my research I have come up with the following plan for the editing process:

1. Big picture edit

For this, I have converted my novel into a Kindle file and am going to read it through quite quickly, making rough notes on any major plot issues, glaring omissions and…

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The thing remains what it is. It is not you. You are not what it is. You know nothing of the thing apart from the growing emerging context. You know nothing about the thing. The thing itself. The thing with respect to itself. From the thing’s frame of reference. From the thing’s point of view.

context, emergence, epistemology, fiction, flash fiction, Friday Fictioneers, philosophical fiction, short stories, writing challenge

Stories

My offering for the latest Friday Fictioneers challenge.

Out of context. Everything begins out of context. Everything begins out of context at least with respect to itself. From its own frame of reference. From its own point of view.

Out of context until something emerges to give it context. A detail. A broad stroke. A battery.

Then the context grows. The context and the emerging details grow and develop a context around the thing. At least with respect to itself. From its own frame of reference. From its own point of view. A jar.

But does the thing grow? Does the thing grow within the emerging context? The detail, the broad stroke, the battery, the jar? Or is it your understanding that grows when the context emerges? Your understanding grows but the thing does not grow. Only the context around it–the context that you understand–grows and emerges and grows. Like…

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“I have long been compelled to write this book because I have discovered solidarity with my fellow second-generation Christians as we search for authentic faith. Children of the church live in a paradox between the biblical knowledge in our heads and the wanderlust in our hearts. Ours is a misunderstood struggle, unknown to those who have been dramatically rescued from enslavement to the world, their faith still fresh.” emphasis mine.

Pilgrim Strong

A few months ago, a pastor/author I’d never heard of contacted me and asked if I’d consider reviewing a book he’d written before it hit the market.

The book’s topic about owning your Christian faith sounded interesting enough, so I said sure,Prepositional phrase and maybe he could reciprocate some time. No problem, he responded, and a virtual handshake deal was done.

A few days later the book arrived, and I carved out some time to give it a thorough read. Just into page two, this paragraph screamed:

“I have long been compelled to write this book because I have discovered solidarity with my fellow second-generation Christians as we search for authentic faith. Children of the church live in a paradoxbetween the biblical knowledge in our heads and the wanderlust in our hearts. Ours is a misunderstood struggle, unknown to those who have been dramatically rescued from enslavement…

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Traditional publishing or Self-publishing? What on your mind?

Traditional publishing or Self-publishing

I missed the dress rehearsal

Last time, I wrote about the quality of self-published books and our expectations of them. While I was reading on that subject, and just about self-publishing and traditional publishing in general, I came across this interesting article from a few months back. He addresses the question of quality and quantity in self-published books, and I think his idea that the industry may evolve in such a way that self-publishing becomes a sort of testing ground or minor league for the major publishers is intriguing.

 

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